, which at its best makes characters complicit in their own bad fates, as jealousy or grief or some other human frailty collides with technology that appears to cater to it.

Here, most of the plot consists of Kenny, and later Hector (Jerome Flynn), a catfished john he joins up with, submitting to the orders of offscreen trolls.

For some couples, behaviors like looking at porn or flirting on Facebook might be perfectly OK, so long as the couple has agreed that the behavior fits within the boundaries of their relationship and secrets are not being kept.

Infidelity is not defined by a specific behavior; it is defined by the secrets that are kept, the lies that are told, and the damage that is done to emotional intimacy and relationship trust.

Other than the trolls’ industriousness, the main difference between the world of “Shut up and Dance” and the real one seems to be the stakes of being hacked.

The episode does a fine job driving home hacking’s humiliating invasiveness.

Consider these examples: None of these individuals has had an in-the-flesh sexual encounter outside of their primary relationship, and yet all four have been accused of infidelity by their spouse.

These scenarios beg the question: A few years ago, in an attempt to answer this question, Jennifer Schneider, Charles Samenow, and I conducted a survey of women whose husbands were engaging in significant amounts of extramarital sexual activity, either online or in the real world.

It only means that both parties wants to keep the door open as an excuse for "smaller" infidelities, because none of them are really committed to the other.

It’s the first season of the show produced by Netflix, after two three-episode series and a special produced by Britain’s Channel 4.

The most sci-fi element in the episode is the competence and discipline of the trolls, who hack the webcam of 19-year-old Kenny (Alex Lawther), film him masturbating, and blackmail him and various other characters into committing increasingly ill-advised acts.

The strongest parts of the episode are the moments when characters realize they’ve been totally owned.

To a betrayed spouse, the emotional pain associated with the loss of trust hurts far more, and the pain lasts far longer, than the hurt caused by any specific sexual or romantic act.