Programmers design chatbots to simulate real conversation long enough to convince you to buy something, click on a link or offer personal information.The key to detecting and reporting them is understanding how they work in various contexts.

Chatbots bring famous celebrities who were earlier way out of reach and their fans closer than ever before.

Thanks to AI, bots allow celebrities to automate chats with fans, engage them in a way that wasn’t possible in the past.

Plus Justin Bot always finds witty innovative ways to ask his followers to not come over to his house.

Much like the real man, Steve Jobs’ bot blurts the truth out.

Now we get into the malicious chatbots: the ones trying to sell you something, take your personal information or cheat you out of money you paid to chat with an online therapist.

Here are the patterns to look for: Mentions a Product or Service The only product or service that should come up quickly during online chats is the one you are using to facilitate the chat.

For fans, they present a case of ‘something’s better than nothing’ and make them feel closer to the celebrities that they look up to.

Quick Note from Talkspace: Because we provide online messaging therapy, we frequently hear from potential clients who want to be sure they are chatting with a therapist, not a chatbot.

With a signature “haters gonna hate,” Trump’s bot brags about his wealth, hotels, casinos and wives!