You swipe right on faces who swipe right on yours, send messages back and forth, and hopefully end up on a real life date. A cute-but-casual locale must be selected, a convenient-but-not-desperate date and time must be agreed upon, and two human beings must actually show up to the cataclysmic event that is a pretty-much-blind date. Because there are many logistics to be planned, but also no one wants their phone blowing up with dating app notifications, there is often another step in the process of Tindering: the text phase.

As I mentioned, I would have never made it to a single app date were it not for the good old number exchange.

I'm admittedly lazy, and checking an app feels so much harder than just replying to an i Message.

"One can throw out their cell after this as a courtesy to connect if someone is running late or they can't find each other at the meetup," explains dating expert Meredith Golden of Spoon Meet

You don't want to be late because there are two ramen spots with the same name, and you have to check in with your date via an app five minutes before you're supposed to meet.

After all, giving out your number shows interest in the person you're talking to and moves you one step closer to making plans.

Ever since someone from Ok Cupid harassed me over text, bombarding me with messages and telling me I was rude for not responding right away, I've been reluctant to give my number out and preferred to keep my conversations on a dating site's interface until I trust the other person not to abuse their texting privileges.That said, if you give your number to a match too soon, you run the risk of endless banter and date rescheduling that never results in an actual meet-and-greet."It's good practice to meet, otherwise [a] 'text buddy' develops, which no one looking for a relationship ever enjoys," explains Golden.Most online daters have had this experience: you start a conversation online, it seems to be going well, then someone drops the ball and nobody picks it up.Often, when a conversation dies down online it's not because anyone said anything offensive.Often, a phone number can be used to find other personal information, like your address, family members, and work history.