Breads were eaten at all times of the day but particularly at breakfast." ---A Cooking Legacy, Virginia T.

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Supper was a smaller meal, often similar to breakfast: bread, cheese, mush or hasty pudding, or warmed-over meat from the noon meal.

Supper among the gentry was also a sociable meal, and might have warm food, meat or shellfish, such as oysters, in season." ---Food in Colonial and Federal America, Sandra L. 157) [NOTE: These books provide excellent descriptions of "average" meals by heritage (Germans, Dutch, Swedes), location (town vs country) and region.

The stoic early settlers rose early and went straight to the chores that demanded their attention.

In frontier outposts and on farms, families drank cider or beer and gulped down a bowl of porridge that had been cooking slowly all night over the embers...

The first course included several meats plus meat puddings and/or deep meat pies containing fruits and spices, pancakes and fritters, and the ever-present side dishes of sauces, pickles and catsups...

Soups seem to have been served before of in conjunction with the first course. An assortment of fresh, cooked, or dried fruits, custards, tarts and sweetmeats was usually available.Colonial meal structures/times were also different from what we know today. For most people in the 18th century it was considered the main (biggest) meal of the day. What did "average" New England colonists eat during a typical day?Breakfast was taken early if you were poor, later if you were rich. "Most New Englanders had a simple diet, their soil and climates allowing limited varieties of fruits and vegetables.The size of breakfasts grew in direct proportion to growth of wealth.Breads, cold meats and, especially in the Northeast, fruit pies and pasties joined the breakfast menus."Sallats," (salads) though more popular at supper, sometimes were served at dinner and occasionally provided decoration in the center of the table...