While the War on Drugs initially had a small impact on incarceration, it was President Reagan’s Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 that kickstarted the prison boom.[1] From 1970 to 2005, the prison population rose 700 percent, while violent crime remained steady or declined.[2] Between 19, the populations of private prisons shot up 1,600 percent.[3] Today, the US has the highest incarceration rate in the world – 754 inmates per 100k residents as of 2008.[1] This is roughly 600% that of the rest of the civilized world, with England and Wales having 148, and Australia 126 inmates per 100k residents.[1] As of 2010, private corporations house over 99,000 inmates in 260 facilities nationwide.[4] Corrections Corp.

” To correctly answer, one must select “protests” among the options of attacking the Pentagon, committing hate crimes and using IED’s.[13] In an interview with Fox News, the Do D stated that they have since removed the question.[14] In 2012, it was reported that FBI trained its agents that they can “bend or suspend the law” at will.[15] The training materials were uncovered during a six-month internal review of the Bureau’s training policies.

Despite its findings, the review has not resulted in any disciplinary action, nor did it require any re-training.[16] With the “terrorism” label being used so loosely, many are critical of the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act.

In New York, inmates refusing work assignments have been known to be placed in solitary confinement for 23 hours a day until work is resumed.[20] At the same time, it is illegal to import products made using prison labor into the United States.[21] Just six corporations[1] own the vast majority of media outlets in the United States.

Through years of relentless mergers, acquisitions and consolidations, a handful of corporations have been able to dominate most of what Americans read, see and hear on a daily basis.

Individual students demonstrating against the Vietnam War were targeted by the FBI, along with American luminaries such as Martin Luther King Jr.

and Albert Einstein.[2][6] The assistant to the Director of the FBI, William C. In 1976, the Church Committee conducted an investigation into the actions of the FBI during Co Intel Pro.[4] Despite Hoover’s statement, the Church Committee concluded that “...

In fact, it is not uncommon for the government body to receive a signing bonus from the carrier, like M in the case of Los Angeles County.[14] Unlike the public, the Federal Communications Commission has no safeguards against price gouging when it applies to those behind bars.

In the federal prison system, all able-bodied inmates who are not a security risk are forced to work for UNICOR or another prison job.[17] UNICOR, also known as Federal Prison Industries, is a government-created corporation that provides many products and services, including clothing, electronics, furniture, data entry and military hardware.[16][18] UNICOR enjoys a “mandatory source clause” that according to US laws & regulations, forces all federal agencies with the exception of the Department of Defense to purchase products offered by UNICOR instead of the private sector.

of America spent 0,000[7] and GEO Group spent 0,000[8] lobbying Congress in 2010 alone. of America’s Feb 2011 press release, CEO Damon Hininger stated, “..are pleased our populations have remained strong, in excess of the 80,000 inmate milestone we surpassed late in 2010.”[9] With the 3.2% increase in inmate population over the previous year, Corrections Corp.

of America was able to make 1.26M profit, earning their CEO over ,000,000 in compensation.[9][10] Private prison proponents claim that private corporations are able to provide the same service more efficiently than the government.

Signed into law by President Obama, the 2012 NDAA is heavily criticized for declaring that American citizens can be held without trial indefinitely on the mere suspicion of supporting terrorism.[17][18] It also contains provisions that allows citizens to be transferred to the custody of foreign nations for interrogation, trial, and/or imprisonment – an act known as “rendition.”[17] While suspected enemy combatants found on the battlefield were already subject to these conditions since the Bush administration, this is the first time that these powers will apply American citizens on American soil.