Chances are if an Asian man is fourth, third, or even second generation, this issue may not prove prohibitive in the least.

This, much like the previous example, is not then specific to Asian men but rather an issue which could stem from being an immigrant from another country/having parents who are immigrants.

“Yellow peril” stereotype) and being very patriarchal, hardworking, and career-oriented, (all of which again in the Western context are coded as masculine).

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I use this example not because I am trying to argue that Koreans or other Asians are in no way prejudiced all by themselves and that those biased ways of seeing things may impede an otherwise decent romantic relationship; rather, I am merely trying to illustrate a degree of complexity to this issue which I feel is oftentimes overlooked.

Although it can seem tempting to write Asian men off because they or their families may have racist notions about Black Americans, when we broaden our purview we see that the issue stretches far beyond that of the Asian (American) community.

While it may seem as though White and Black Americans are positioned on antithetical ends of an idyllic racial spectrum, I would argue that in actuality it is Asians who are presented as the polar opposites of their Black counterparts (in many respects with Asians as hypo and Black Americans as hyper ).

For instance, as a whole Asians are seen as small, quiet, and unassertive (which in a Western context are coded as feminine), whereas Black people are presented as big, loud, and physically dominant/imposing (which in turn are coded as masculine).

While I can see some potential obstacles which could prove to be problematic such as issues of colorism, the desire to maintain cultural traditions by dating within one’s own ethnic group, etc., if we interrogate the underlying reasons for their existence, it becomes increasingly evident that none are necessarily specific to the Asian American community and should therefore in no way discourage Black American women from considering Asian men as potential partners.

In her work, “Imperial Citizens: Koreans and Race from Seoul to LA” sociologist, Nadia Kim, explores the real or imagined racial tension between Korean and Black Americans in L. Rather than abide by the commonly held belief that conflict may stem from actual differences in culture (between members of the respective groups), she instead illustrates how some Koreans are actually influenced by the US mass media to view Black Americans negatively prior to their arrival in this country.It is a problem of mass media representation, global cultural and information flows, and a lack of autonomy for people of color (including Asians) to choose how they are portrayed and for and by whom.The other major concern which I sometimes hear for why Black American and other women may hesitate to consider Asian men as potential partners is that they fear that Asian men are bound by culture, particularly in the form of filial piety.First, I would just like to commend you for the outstanding work you have done and thank you for navigating these issues of race in the way that you do.It is never easy to tackle since everyone’s feelings and opinions regarding their own background as well as the backgrounds of others oftentimes vary greatly; however, your honest engagement and down-to-earth personality make all the difference.While my lack of Asian family ties/parentage may make me seem like a less-than-ideal candidate to respond to your initial question, I think that it is for that very reason that my insight may prove to be of value.